Weisbrot on why the European authorities are still punishing Greece

Mark Weisbrot
Alexis Tsipras has a tough job. He is leader of the Syriza Party of Greece, a left party that has risen meteorically in the past three years: from 4.6 percent of the vote in 2009 to 27 percent last June. It is now the most popular party in the country and Tsipras could be the next Prime Minister. Unlike most of the eurozone's leaders, he knows what is wrong with Greece and the eurozone, and so does his party: austerity. "We have become the guinea pig for barbaric, violent neoliberal policies," he said at a forum at Columbia University Law School last week, in which I participated. Tsipras notes that Greece's fiscal problems could be resolved if the rich paid their taxes. The IMF's latest numbers [PDF] concur on this: according to the Fund, "annual uncollected net tax revenue [is] at 86 percent of collections in Greece, against an OECD average of 12 percent."
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Comments

  1. Mark Weisbrot’s article is a good bit of emotionally charged reporting suitable for non-economists looking for their daily adrenalin fix.

    As to those seriously into economics, like me, I didn’t spot anything new or significant in Weisbrot’s article.

    ReplyDelete

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